SOL: Hot for Teacher

Ok, not really, but …

I’m taking a Skype-based Spanish class, and I have to say I’m really loving it. I have five more lessons set up before I leave for Mexico … and I’m sure that, by then, I’ll have a full-fledged crush on my instructor. Oh, so very not cool, but there it is.

Back story: I wanted to do a little advance studying before heading ‘down Mexico way’ next month. And, as much as it shames me to say it, I’m not a very good student. I couldn’t make myself pick up my text book and do a single thing. But then I stumbled across a website that claimed to be able to set me up with one-on-one lessons online … and they’d give me two free just to see if I liked it. It’s a pretty excellent arrangement. You pick a teacher, you pick the time for your lesson, you pay your $12 and at the appointed time you put on your headset and wait for that funky little Skype ring on your computer and your 1-hour lesson begins. Because you’re the only student, the lesson is completely customized for you. So I could say, for example, “I need to build up my vocabulary and learn how to use the past tense.”

I’ve had three lessons now — would have been four if my internet hadn’t gone down last Thursday — and I love this! After the first lesson, I immediately reserved five more. All of my classes but one are with the same instructor because his schedule matches the times I’m free for class.

Our conversations are pretty funny. My big complaint about my Spanish is that I only know how to talk about my job, so my teacher — let’s call him Martín — keeps trying to make me talk about other things … and I keep connecting nearly everything he asks me about to my job! But last night I had to talk about music I like. Yeah, you try explaining Rage Against the Machine in Spanish. Or Living Colour. Or Queen. Even the Spanish music gave me a hard time. Martín hadn’t heard of Susana Baca, so I found myself trying to explain the four seconds I know of Afro-Peruvian history and how it’s connected to Baca’s music. My vocabulary definitely increased after that little workout!

Um, yeah, so this crush? Well, he just sounds really good, doesn’t he? He’s got one of those fabulous, dark-chocolate radio voices … and, you know, he’s speaking another language, which makes everything he says sound just a teenty tiny bit sexier … and it certainly doesn’t hurt that he’s quite liberal with the flattery (what a wonderful voice I have, I must be a singer with such a beautiful speaking voice, how amazing that I don’t have an American accent, my accent is almost Mexican …).

Right. Twelve years old, I am. Back to Rotterdam and my hopeless crush on nearly the entire varsity basketball team!

_____

Oh, I really didn’t want to do it, but how could I resist? I stole their title, after all, so it’s only fair …

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6 thoughts on “SOL: Hot for Teacher

  1. I think it’s entirely fine to have a crush on your teacher. (Can you see him via the Skype?) I get crushes on teachers very routinely (and doctors). Several of my trumpet teachers qualified (from the very first one I ever had to the most recent, now that I think about it), a composing professor, an English professor, uh, two English professors … Speaking of the hallowed first and last trumpet teachers, I studied with one when I was 13 or 14, in Michigan, and the last here in California, when I was in my 30s. They BOTH are now in the Toledo Symphony–weird.

  2. Sadly, Martín doesn’t have his photo posted, and our lessons are voice-only, not video. Much more tragic is that he just told me (just finished a lesson ten minutes ago) that I will have a substitute teacher Friday and Monday because he has to go out of town. Feh.

    And Martín is certainly not the first teacher I’ve had a crush on. It just seems a little silly in this case because he’s just a voice … and because he’s in Guatemala!

  3. Guatemala is a good choice for Spanish language instruction, they are reputed to have one of the best accents. Where in México are you going?
    Don’t be discouraged about learning Spanish, I moved here thinking that I was fluent. Now, almost 5 years later, I think I may be an intermediate Spanish speaker. If it’s something ordinary I can talk about it, I can bargain and read the paper. Occasionally, I get the crazy lady stare when I forget a word that I should obviously know, for example, at the mercer’s I’ll ask for sewing machine needles,bias binding and forget the word for zipper. They then half ask, half state “you aren’t from here?”
    I am enjoying your blog, I found it through “Ask and ye shall receive”
    regards,
    Theresa

  4. Oh, Mom, I definitely agree. I listen to Martín and think of all those great DJs from late-night radio …

    Hi, Theresa– How exciting that you moved to Mexico! I have a friend who did that a few years after we finished college (many, many years ago!), and she’s been there ever since. She became a citizen a couple of years ago.

    Thanks for the encouragement about learning Spanish. I know I won’t be fluent in only a couple of weeks, I just hope I come home feeling more confident to keep trying. The online thing is working pretty well. I have another lesson scheduled tonight (sadly, not with Martín, as he’s had to cancel for the next two sessions 😦 )

    I’m going to a school in Playa del Carmen, and I’ll be staying in Puerto Morelos. I had really hoped to be attending a week-long training for my job this November in Guadalajara, but I don’t think that’ll be happening. I think I’ll keep up with the online lessons after I get home, though (and not just because Martín’s so nice to listen to!)

  5. If it works, don’t know it! You won’t be the first person to learn a foreign language because of a crush!
    I think in Playa you really won’t need too much Spanish, but people will be thrilled if you try. I think that I even heard that they accept dollars there.
    When I went to Isla Mujeres for the Latin American Bloggers Meeting (it was a social thing and great fun) the people there were shocked that I spoke Spanish and I was equally surprised that they spoke English. Here in Mérida I never assume someone speaks English.
    My friend who teaches foreign languages (among other subjects) in Pennsylvania got a grant from her school to come and do Mayan Studies here for a month. I met her when she took a year long sabbatical to live here in Mérida so her kids could experience a foreign culture.
    regards,
    Theresa

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